The Lost Sega Worlds

Discussion in 'General Sega Discussion' started by Black Squirrel, Nov 10, 2020.

  1. Ted618

    Ted618

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  2. Ted618

    Ted618

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    You've heard of "Hi-Tech Land Sega" and "Hi-Tech Sega", now get ready for

    [​IMG]

    "Hi-Tech King": the latest (and possibly greatest, if the name is to be believed) in the largely-uncharted waters of Sega's "Hi-Tech" urban game centres that predated the Sega Worlds. This one was apparently in Nakano. I randomly came across it in Game Machine while looking for something else entirely, and there may well be more coverage - I've only barely scratched the surface with this period in its run, compared to others.

    I personally haven't came across this outgrowth of the "Hi-Tech" naming scheme previously, and I'd be inclined to say it was a one-off, at least if documentation of this period wasn't patchy at best. Can't rule out them rebranding all the others to fit in at some point after this, though I can't find any suggestion of this example ever receiving that treatment... or indeed anything else about it at all, for that matter.
     
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  3. Gryson

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    Apologies if I'm missing something, but I don't think that's a Sega operation. The article says "it's independently run but last year they changed to a policy of leasing exclusively from Sega." The manager said they had previously been buying machines but that it had become too expensive due to how quickly the turnover cycle had become. According to the internet, the word 'hi-tech' was in common usage since at least the early 80s in Japan.
     
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  4. Black Squirrel

    Black Squirrel

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    You can just see the bottom of a Sega "S" on the sign. I would imagine there were a few independents that became Sega franchisees.

    I like the idea of a "Hi-Tech King". Robot arms and a throne with lasers.
     
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  5. Ted618

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    That is the case, but Sega clearly seem to have taken the location under their wing, so to speak. Compare the décor to other Hi-Tech locations from around that time:

    [​IMG]

    It's indeed suspected there's more examples of this, like Pasopiard Yokohama, and probably many others that we won't ever know about since Sega just didn't lend their branding - the latter probably shouldn't fall within the remit of Retro, but the former doesn't look out of place alongside the others that actually were directly managed.
     
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  6. Gryson

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    I mean, as I translated, the article explicitly says it's an independently run operation that leases exclusively from Sega (thus the Sega logo on the sign?). And that was a change that had occurred within the last year. I don't think there's any evidence that Sega was involved with the place beyond that... so the name is probably just a coincidence since Hi-Tech was a common word.
     
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  7. Black Squirrel

    Black Squirrel

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    This is something to think about, but I don't know how best to handle it yet:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20071204040215/http://sega.jp/corp/release/2004/0310_1/

    [​IMG]

    There's a load of Japanese properties that Sega had a hand in constructing, such as this one, "S-PULSE DREAM HOUSE".

    Opened in March 2004, it was a... place... for fans of the J.League football team, Shimizu S-Pulse. Somewhere to watch matches, eat food, buy things and play WCCF (aka the Sega bit). It still exists, but only as a shop, although there was (and may still be) a small chain of these things.

    It appears that over the last couple of decades, Sega has branched into quite a few more "nuanced" entertainment ventures. Shops and cafes and restaurants that don't have SEGA in massive letters over the door. I don't know how to handle this on the wiki - whether they all get separate pages, or are just compiled as a big list.
     
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  8. Ted618

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    I've been thinking about how to present the LB Style Square stores for a while too - shops selling Love and Berry clothing and likely also housing a number of cabinets. There were apparently over 60 of the things at one point, and Mushiking had a temporary equivalent held at other venues.

    [​IMG]
    Similar to Oasis Park, Sega also seems to have had a hand in this place, Festival Walk (and in fact may still partly continue to, judging by how it's remained on their website). Sega Arena Soga is on the premises but I'm not quite sure of the association past that point.
    [​IMG]
    One last thing I discovered a little while ago is that in what is possibly his most unsung piece of work for Sega, Yu Suzuki had a hand in designing a "I Can't Believe It's Yogurt" café featuring Beach Spikers and Virtua Fighter art for Tokyo Joypolis around the early 2000s.
     
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  9. Black Squirrel

    Black Squirrel

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    I think there might have been a chain of Sakura Taisen cafes too, but there's so much going on with that franchise that it's impossible to parse.