Sonic 2/Chaos/Triple Trouble map reverse-engineering and RAM data

Discussion in 'Engineering & Reverse Engineering' started by Rolken, Feb 28, 2008.

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  1. Rolken

    Rolken

    Tech Member
    So awhile ago I made some SPA maps for competition purposes; now I have made more for 8-bit Sonic 2, Chaos and Triple Trouble. In the process I had to figure out the encoding for the maps, blocks, tiles, and palettes, so here it is. If there are other things people care about regarding the games there's a good chance I came across it as well. My tools included the Emukon/Mekaw debugging emulators, an SMS disassembler I got from SMSPower (but use with caution as it left out some important sections of code for me), a hex editor, and this document on using the hardware. My research was directed first at cracking STT and then extending that knowledge to Chaos and 8-bit Sonic 2, since they're mostly the same engine; the main points of difference were hardcoded addresses and 2/Chaos's map compression being somewhat inferior. Also, for what it's worth, I'm not under any illusion that there's likely to be much of anyone else who cares about this tome I'm about to write - I'm writing it largely for my own reference in the future, and thought I might as well dress it up for general consumption. :P All numbers cited are hex, and the terms "MS" and "LS" refer to most significant and least significant.

    Here are the map images and PHP image-generating source. Rename the source to sttrom.php, edit the first set of variables to have working ROM filenames, set it in a live directory and it will work. I haven't made it functional on TSC's server to avoid stressing it out. If you just want a map call stt.rom?level=#, where the # is the level offset indicated in the filename of each map .png. Add &tiles=1 to get an output of the level's tiles, &blocks=1 to see the map block components, &gray=1 to turn off palettes, and/or &game=chaos or &game=s2gg to switch to Sonic Chaos or 2 instead of Triple Trouble. I assume Game Gear ROMs, so don't try sticking in an SMS Chaos rom. There are some minor map differences, so I might adapt the code to it at some later point if it's not too much hassle.

    I'm not sure to what degree this is standard, since SMS cartridges use their own bankswitch methods, but the Sonic cartridges use 0000-7FFF as the equivalent first section of the ROM and 8000-BFFF as a bankswitched segment, which is determined by writing the bank number to FFFF. As such, any address that refers to a segment of the ROM above 8000 will have the actual ingame address of (offset) % 4000 + 8000, ie. 4135F -> 935F (which is highly annoying when trying to find specific references).

    A summary: graphics are composed of 8x8 tiles, which are loaded into 8x16 sprites (not covered yet) or 32x32 pixel 4x4 tile blocks of 8x8 tiles. A rectangular array of blocks is what composes the map. There are also two 16 color palettes, one for blocks only and one for sprites and blocks.

    As for the things I haven't done yet: Sprites in Chaos/STT are represented only by their IDs, which includes all badniks, most monitors and some rings. S2 objects remain completely gone. The water level also is absent, which is just a palette switch after a particular raster line.

    The first point of interest in the ROM is the 8x8 tile methodology. The set of tile addresses is an index hardcoded in the ROM [STT:6B678|SC:7CEF|S2:7903], at which a set of seven bytes for each level give-
    Tile Bank
    ??
    ??
    LS Tile Address
    MS Tile Address
    ??
    ??

    Skip to that tile address, and you get
    ??
    ??
    LS Number of Tiles
    MS Number of Tiles
    LS Guide Address (offset from Tile Address)
    MS Guide Address (offset from Tile Address)
    henceforth - Tile Data

    For some reason STT checks the game mode byte and if it sees TA mode it overrides the usual zone/act tile selection and instead forces the address equivalent to level 29, whereas the TA mode level itself is level 30. I can't see why they made that special case behaviour instead of just correcting the address for level 30, but they did.

    You need to work with both the tile data and the "guide" data at the same time - the "guide" is a set of 2-bit flags, 4 per byte, from LS to MS, that indicate what to do with the tile data, as follows:

    0 - The tile is blank and uses no data
    1 - The tile is a direct uncompressed copy of 20 bytes
    2 - The tile is compressed
    3 - The tile is compressed and an xor scheme should be applied to it (see php source)

    The compression is of variable length, and as such there's no way to jump to a specific tile in the ROM; they have to be decompressed in order. The compression is relatively simple and consists of a 20-bit bitmask which indicates whether to load a byte of data or just push in 00. Here's an example, in which * indicates a compressed 0. Note that it processes bitmask word pairs "backwards", as with addresses.

    Code (Text):
    1.          5      D       E       7       5       6       7       5
    2. D57E6557 FF**FF**|C0**C03F|**3F3FC0|3FC0FF**|FC**FF**|**3FFF**|3FC0FF**|0F**FF**
    The set of palette IDs are at [STT:3BF1C|SC:7F3C|S2:7BA1], and this is just a straight list of two bytes per level, the background palette and the object palette. The palettes themselves are at [STT:3B6FC|SC:3B653|S2:26E45], and adding the palette ID * 20 (the size of a palette) will take you to the one you're looking for.

    The index of map data can be found at [STT:434F|SC:5139|S2:546A]. Add 2*zone bytes to that and you'll find the zone index; go to that address, add 2*act and you get the address of your level's map data. For the curious, here's what IIRC is a complete set of STT and somewhat less of a complete set from SC. The ??s are almost certainly special stages and ending sequences.

    STT:
    Code (Text):
    1.       [block][ map ] wdth
    2. TH1 - 1100 8012 C080 A800 58FF 9804 0000 0800 3014 3802 334D
    3. TH2 - 1100 8012 B489 A800 58FF 9804 0000 0800 3014 3802 334D
    4. TH3 - 1100 801A 49B0 4000 C0FF C001 0000 0800 3007 3802 034E
    5.  
    6. SP1 - 1180 9B12 5A92 A800 58FF 9804 0000 0800 3014 3802 334D
    7. SP2 - 1180 9B12 159C 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    8. SP3 - 1180 9B12 159C 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    9.  
    10. MJ1 - 1B00 8012 AAA5 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    11. MJ2 - 1B00 8012 45AF 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    12. MJ3 - 1B00 8014 80B2 4000 C0FF C001 0000 0800 3007 3803 034E
    13.  
    14. RW1 - 1400 8014 A5B5 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    15. RW2 - 1400 8015 0080 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    16. RW3 - 1400 8012 23B9 6000 A0FF A002 0000 0800 300B 3804 A34D
    17.  
    18. TP1 - 14E0 9915 6686 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    19. TP2 - 14E0 9915 3490 3000 D0FF 5001 0000 0800 3005 3809 934E
    20. TP3 - 14E0 9915 0B9A 4000 C0FF C001 0000 0800 3007 3801 034E
    21.  
    22. AD1 - 1B00 9C15 109B 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    23. AD2 - 1B00 9C15 7AA5 6000 A0FF A002 0000 0800 300B 3804 A34D
    24. AD3 - 1B00 9C15 E3AF A800 58FF 9804 0000 0800 3014 3802 334D
    25.  
    26. SS1 - 1940 8315 68B5 A800 58FF 9804 0000 0800 3014 3802 334D
    27. SS3 - 1940 8315 3BB9 3000 D0FF 5001 0000 0800 3005 3809 934E
    28. SS5 - 1940 831A ABB2 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 3803 634D
    29.  
    30. Intro-1100 8012 0080 4000 C0FF C001 0000 0800 3007 3800 034E
    31. End - 1100 8016 2AB1 A800 58FF 9804 0000 0800 3014 3802 334D
    SC:
    Code (Text):
    1.       [block][ map ] wdth
    2. TH1 - 1100 8012 0080 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    3. TH2 - 1100 8012 A98B 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    4. TH3 - 1100 8012 2C98 5000 B0FF 3002 0000 0800 3009 1001 1E5C
    5.  
    6. GP1 - 1140 9612 3B9C A000 60FF 6004 0000 0800 3013 1002 1A5B
    7. GP2 - 1140 9612 16AA 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    8. GP3 - 1140 9612 ADB8 5000 B0FF 3002 0000 0800 3009 1001 1E5C
    9.  
    10. SE1 - 1140 AA15 0080 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    11. SE2 - 1140 AA15 C88C 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    12. SE3 - 1140 AA14 60B4 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    13.  
    14. MGH1- 1400 8015 D499 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    15. MGH2- 1400 8015 B8A6 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    16. MGH3- 1400 8015 FBB2 7800 88FF 4803 0000 0800 300E 1002 8E5B
    17.  
    18. AP1 - 1420 9317 0080 A800 58FF 9804 0000 0800 3014 1002 EA5A
    19. AP2 - 1420 9317 C187 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    20. AP3 - 1420 9315 A6B8 5000 B0FF 3002 0000 0800 3009 1001 1E5C
    21.  
    22. EE1 - 14E0 A417 3A8F 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    23. EE2 - 14E0 A417 739B 8000 80FF 8003 0000 0800 300F 1003 4E5B
    24. EE3 - 14E0 A417 53A8 7000 90FF 1003 0000 0800 300D 1003 D45B
    The block/map addresses are of the form
    Bank
    LS Address
    MS Address

    Note that Sunset Park 2-3 have the same map, and if you've played the game, you'll recall that there's not actually a transition between them unless you die.

    Hit up that block address and you find a 200 byte collection of 2 byte offsets from the "main" block address. These 100 blocks correspond to the block numbers that will be used in the map; the first block is 00, second 01, etc. Some of the blocks will be identical offsets, which I assume is for the purpose of tagging them with additional effects such as breakability or hidden springage. At the offset is a collection of 20 bytes which form the actual block; each 2-byte segment defines a tile according to the SMS's specification found in the document I mentioned at the beginning, including the tile ID, palette, v/h flipping and bg/fg. The tile order is the same as printed English, left to right, top to bottom.

    With the map compression comes the one substantive difference I found between the game engines. All map schemes uncompressed are identical - left-to-right, top-to-bottom, like the printed word again, across the whole map, with the width column in the above table of hex specifying how many blocks wide the map is. The SC map compression is pretty basic - just load all the data into RAM unless you come across an FF, which indicates that the next two bytes are a map piece and how many times to copy that piece. FFFF00 indicates that the map is over. Sonic 2's map loading is substantially similar to Chaos's, except that it uses FD to signal an identical string instead of FF, in identical strings the length comes before the byte to copy instead of after, and there's no indicator that the map is done - it just absorbs 1000 bytes regardless of whether they're garbage.


    STT map compression is a tad more complicated; I just found the routine in the code and basically copied it word for word. It takes in a eight bit bitmask whenever its current bitmask runs dry; for each bit it tests, if that bit is 0 it copies in a byte of data, and if 1 that indicates that there is compressed data. The compression scheme works by copying data from a prior point in the map that has been already loaded. It reads in two bytes for directions: The MS half of the second byte + 3 indicates how many bytes to copy, and is then papered over with F so that the two bytes together can define the offset from the current position (which will always be backwards and less than 1000 because of the F and two's complement). If the two bytes are 0000, then the map is done.

    Here's an example, from the first level of STT:
    Code (Text):
    1. F1FE FFFF FFFF FFFF FEFE 0D05
    So F1 is the bitmask control byte, which put backwards in binary according to how the game uses it would be 10001111. OK, so we're loading in one byte, doing three compressed sequences, then loading in four more.

    So take in that FE. Now for the compression, we read in FFFF. That third F, the MS half of the second byte, indicates we're doing F+3 or 12 bytes of copying. It gets papered over with an F (no effect in this instance), so our offset is FFFF, or back one byte.

    What this means is that it will copy the FE over one byte, then the "read from" address will move over into that FE that was just copied and the "copy to" address to the next empty space, and so repeating the process another 11 times we'll get 11 extra FEs. This behavioral quirk only happens when the offset is FFFF; otherwise you'd be copying in, say, the previous 2 bytes over and over if the offset was FEFF, the previous 3 if FDFF, or just a plain block if it was any offset larger than the number of bytes we're copying.

    According to the next two bits in the bitmask, we're doing two more FFFF compression sequences, so that gives us 24 more FEs. The last four bits in the bitmask gives us four straight bytes, so we copy in FEFE0D05, and then we load in another bitmask and start the process again. The result so far is 27 FEs in a row, with 0D05 at the end.

    Anyway, if you're interested in this compression scheme you can check out the source compression at the addresses mentioned in the big block of hex above, and the output uncompressed map you can see in Emukon or Mekaw by loading up the appropriate level and pointing the memory viewer to C001, which is where it starts. I thought it was pretty nifty.

    So my map program just makes two images, assigns them 32-color palettes, reads all the 8x8 tiles in and creates all the 32x32 blocks pixel-by-pixel in the block image, copies them into the map image according to the map, and calls it a day.

    If there's any other inquiries I'll be happy to take them.
     
  2. Overlord

    Overlord

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    Very nice work!
     
  3. biggestsonicfan

    biggestsonicfan

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    Absolutely phenomenal. You blew me away the first time, but this, this takes the cake! Bravo, you're a true insperation to Sonic handheld enthusiasts everywhere!
     
  4. Techokami

    Techokami

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    This is rather impressive! But, I have some problems with your script. I can't seem to load anything from Sonic Chaos, nor anything from Atomic Destroyer Zone in Sonic Triple Trouble. Also, I think those last 5 levels in your Triple Trouble level list are the 5 special stages (even though the second and fourth stage are mainly 3D stages in the Tornado, they cut to a battle against Nack in a regular stage after you have collected the needed rings).
     
  5. Rolken

    Rolken

    Tech Member
    I haven't taken the time to explicitly check the correspondence of the ??s yet, but I'm almost certain that ??1/??2/??3 are special stages 1/3/5, which are then reused for the 2/4 boss arenas a-la Sunset Park 3, and that ??A/??B are the opening and closing (note that they use the same block set as the first zone).

    As for the problem, that is quite odd. Does it output a garbled image or nothing at all? If the latter try commenting out this line:
    header('Content-type: image/png');
    and see if it spits out an error. If the former, make sure you're using US Game Gear ROMs specifically (ie no Sonic & Tails), and if so send me the image.
     
  6. Techokami

    Techokami

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    It outputs nothing at all. I'll try your edit later today.
     
  7. Qjimbo

    Qjimbo

    Your friendly neighbourhood lemming. Oldbie
    A map generating php script? Fantastic.

    That is some great work you've achieved there!
     
  8. drx

    drx

    mfw Researcher
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    :rolleyes:
    If you are interested, I've done many things like that (php generating fun images). When I first cracked the format used to store 32x graphics in Chaotix, I made a generator in php, it's even on my site (yes, it generates images on the fly)

    http://www.hidden-palace.org/?stats is also cool, and I've got some more, but I'm getting way off topic.
     
  9. Rolken

    Rolken

    Tech Member
    I'm heading out the door so I don't have time for a proper update, but new maps are up. Special stages and other periphery, object IDs (no images yet), slightly wonky 8-bit Sonic 2.
     
  10. Spanner

    Spanner

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    Ah, excellent work Rolken. It wouldn't be a pain to do Sonic 1 & Sonic Blast's maps would it, since you have the maps from the other games.
     
  11. Rolken

    Rolken

    Tech Member
    Sonic 1 was by a different developer and had a completely different engine. Luckily, someone has already done it. :P

    Sonic Blast... er... well. It does some acrobatics to cram everything into the game gear's graphics capabilities, and my patience for researching the game doesn't extend much beyond my patience for playing it. I'll give it a go, but don't hold your breath.

    For the curious, here is a fair amount of data on STT's RAM usage.

    Code (Text):
    1. C000:     Last memory control port write (see documentation)
    2. C001-D000: Map block data
    3. D001-D0FF: empty
    4. D134:     00=pause, FF=running
    5. D135:     frame counter loops 00-FF
    6. D137-D138: controls
    7. D139-D13B: initiate button press
    8. D141:     frame counter loops 0-7
    9. D142:     frame counter loops 00-FF
    10. D143:     game mode (see below)
    11. D144:     game mode controller (see below)
    12. D145:     zone
    13. D147:     act
    14. D14D-E: score in hundreds
    15. D15D:     second counter
    16. D15E:     minute counter (F = level complete)
    17. D183:     frame counter loops seconds
    18. D187:     screen position row in blocks
    19. D196:     screen position column in blocks
    20. D198:     some relation to screen column
    21. D199:     some relation to screen row
    22. D19A-B: screen position column in pixels
    23. D19C-D: screen position row in pixels
    24. D19E-D1DD: some kind of proximity block cache
    25. D29E-D2E5: some kind of proximity block cache
    26. D2E6-D39D: empty
    27. D3B2-D3B3: screen column (same as D19A-B)
    28. D3B4-D3B5: screen row (same as D19C-D)
    29. D41F:     current block for collision routine (usually, but not always, the block standing on. see: loops)
    30. D43F-D467: loaded and destroyed object IDs; the actual ID, in its byte
    31. D4B3-D4D2: background palette
    32. D4D3-D4F2: object palette
    33. D4F6:     background fade - bit 7 indicates fade, bits 0-3 indicate fade level
    34. D4F7:     background palette index
    35. D4F8:     object fade - bit 7 indicates fade, bits 0-3 indicate fade level
    36. D4F9:     object palette index
    37. D600-D6FF: empty
    38. D700-D73F: object 1
    39. D740-D77F: object 2
    40. D780-D7BF: object 3
    41. D7C0-D7FF: object 4
    42. D800-DAFF: more objects
    43. DD00-DDFF: empty
    44. DFEE-DFEF: title screen duration countdown

    D144 game mode change bits (bits 0/1 appear to work together, others are distinct)
    Code (Text):
    1. 00: normal without sprite updating
    2. 01: ?? used in drowning
    3. 02: normal with sprite updating
    4. 03: ??
    5. 04: death
    6. 08: ?? used in drowning
    7. 10: end of level
    8. 20: bonus warp
    9. 40: emerald obtained (use with 10)
    10. 80: ??
    D143 game mode settings
    Code (Text):
    1. 00: sega
    2. 01: intro
    3. 02: title
    4. 03: demo
    5. 04: level card
    6. 05: level
    7. 06: level clear screen
    8. 07: continue / game over / time over
    9. 09: 2D bonus stage
    10. 0A: bonus stage clear screen
    11. 0D: 3D bonus stage
    12. 11: time attack
    13. 14: try again
    14. 16: level select
    15. 18: character select
    16. 19: sound test
    And for what it's worth, here's an internal zone list. Each zone is three acts; for "zones" with less than three acts, the acts are usually identical. For STT, the 3D special stages reuse the first special stage's boss arena / emerald altar.

    Sonic 2
    0: Underground
    1: Sky High
    2: Aqua Lake
    3: Green Hill
    4: Gimmick Mountain
    5: Scrambled Egg
    6: Crystal Egg
    7: Endings
    8: Scrambled Egg (bad tiles)
    9: Intro / Title

    Sonic Chaos
    0: Turquoise Hill
    1: Giga[lo]polis
    2: Sleeping Egg
    3: Mecha Green Hill
    4: Aqua Planet
    5: Electric Egg
    6: Turquoise Hill (again)
    7: Intro
    8: Special Stage 1
    9: Special Stage 2
    A: Special Stage 3
    B: Special Stage 4
    C: Special Stage 5

    Sonic Triple Trouble
    0: Great Turquoise
    1: Sunset Park
    2: Meta Junglira
    3: Robotnik Winter
    4: Tidal Plant
    5: Atomic Destroyer
    6: Special Stages
    7: Intro / Ending
    8: Great Turquoise (bad tiles)
    9: Special Stage 1 (third has abnormal palette)
    A: Time Attack

    Alterations to the map script - I'll edit all the rest of this post into the first post too where it's relevant.

    The palette loading is now properly rigorous. The set of palette IDs are at [STT:3BF1C|SC:7F3C|S2:7BA1], and this is just a straight list of two bytes per level, the background palette and the object palette. The palettes themselves are at [STT:3B6FC|SC:3B653|ST:26E45], and adding the palette ID * 20 (the size of a palette) will take you to the one you're looking for.

    Sonic 2's map loading is substantially similar to Chaos's, except that it uses FD to signal an identical string instead of FF, in identical strings the length comes before the byte to copy instead of after, and there's no indicator that the map is done - it just absorbs 1000 bytes regardless of whether they're garbage.

    Also, when loading tiles, for some reason STT checks the game mode byte and if it sees TA mode it overrides the usual zone/act tile selection and instead forces the address equivalent to level 29, whereas the TA mode level itself is level 30. I can't see why they made that special case behaviour instead of just correcting the address for level 30, but they did.

    Anyway, that's it for today, tune in next week for another episode of Far More than You Ever Wanted To Know About Portable Sonic.
     
  12. Shoemanbundy

    Shoemanbundy

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    Someone ought to use this as a start for porting these games to genesis.... ;)
     
  13. Techokami

    Techokami

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    Except he never bothered with the formats; instead he made a hack so he could manipulate the camera freely and take a fuckload of screenshots. You're actually using the data from the ROM and generating the maps with a script.
     
  14. Techokami

    Techokami

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    Pardon the double post, but thanks to this utility's ability to show blocks, I noticed something interesting in the graphics for Sonic Chaos' special stages: a lot of unused art!
    Here's the blocks for the 1st, 2nd, and 4th special stage:
    [​IMG]
    Blocks 03 to 0B are unused. It's an alternate interior background pattern, as opposed to the one used in the levels (blocks 26, 28 to 2F)
    Also, block B7 is interesting... a floating wall? Hmmm.

    Here's the blocks for the 3rd and 5th special stage:
    [​IMG]
    Most of this is unused: the slopes (10 to 19, 1E to 23), the red blocks (0A and 0B), the decorative pillar (0F, 25 to 28), the other two decorative crystal structures (29 and 2A), what I *THINK* is breakable wall (0D), and that odd wall again (B7).
     
  15. Mad Echidna

    Mad Echidna

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    VERY nice. I've always felt that Sonic 2 for Game Gear was an amazing and under-rated game. I loved the unique boss battles and fast paced engine. Especially the climactic battle with Silver Sonic, with Sonic and Silver Sonic bouncing off the walls and eachother, wow. And how the egg prisons would vibrate in the air, I couldn't believe those graphics were possible on the GG.
     
  16. Overlord

    Overlord

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    Sonic 2 for Game Gear was fucking annoying, and I speak as someone who bought the fucking thing new back in the 90s. To this day I have yet to beat the stage 1 boss on it. At least it's doable on the Master System version.
     
  17. Sik

    Sik

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    WTF the only two problems I have with that game are getting the second chaos emerald (it's damn too hard) and beating the water zone (I don't remember it's exact time right now). And if you pay attention, the first boss is completely beatable in the GG version as the ball falls in a completely predictable way.

    EDIT: typo.
     
  18. Rolken

    Rolken

    Tech Member
    Well, I'm not sure if you mean porting the levels to the 16-bit Sonic engine or porting the 8-bit engines themselves or something else, but if someone was interested I would be willing to provide whatever knowledge was necessary on the 8-bit side.

    Well, sure. I have been looking through the SCHG on the wiki, and apparently a lot is already known about the internals of the game, so it'd be pretty quick and straightforward to make a map generator, but it's pretty close to the same result anyway.

    Yeah, there's some unused art in Triple Trouble too. I was planning on drawing up per-game charts of block art along with related mechanics, but I haven't done so yet; I'm a bit burned out on writing up large tomes of technical text for now.

    Honestly, I'm in Overlord's boat. :P I made the maps as a quick aside because the games are so similar, so I'm glad that someone cares, but I can't stand the game. I was pretty annoyed when I found out that the reason the first boss was so hard was that it was designed for a larger screen where you can actually see what's going on. The only boss level I could reliably beat as a kid was the final boss, largely because it's the only one I could get to without an awful gauntlet of zero-ring blind jumps. Ugh.

    Also I took a preliminary look at deducing Chaotix's mapping formats with Debugens, but I was astonished at the awful tools you 16-bit hackers put up with. No breakpoints? No frame advance? You have to pause the game and go through a menu to see the processor status or tilesets, and no no live RAM viewer/editor? And no separate windows or dialogs for anything? That's not my idea of fun. I have a renewed respect for anyone who can put up with that.

    edit: Whoops, this post came up while I was writing the last one. I'm used to SMF notifying me of new responses.
    Um, no. I just went and checked the game, save stated right before the boss, and the ball fell in a different pattern each time. You can quibble about what level of difficulty is acceptable, and I hate to sidetrack the topic with a referendum on that game, but it's pretty factual that there is a much lower margin of error on Game Gear Sonic 2 act 3s than any other Sonic game. I mean, the first boss of the 8-bit version puts the final boss of the 16-bit version to shame in difficulty.
     
  19. muteKi

    muteKi

    Fuck it Member
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    GHZ Act 3 is the bane of my existence. They could have at least given you a ring or two...

    Also, you might want to try the KMod Gens.
     
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