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How can I rip music from my Genesis?

Discussion in 'General Sega Discussion' started by Ravenfreak, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. Ravenfreak

    Ravenfreak

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    I'm curious and I also want to rip some songs from my Genesis games, but I have no clue what equipment I need. Can someone help me?
     
  2. Glisp

    Glisp

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    None at the moment I'm afraid.
    So! You want to learn how to rip music? Well probably the best way would be to use Gens or Kega Fusion. (Kega Fusion is your best bet as it emulates more accurately but both can rip music.)

    Now, on Kega Fusion window go to the Sound tab and scroll down through the opened menu until you get to something that reads: Dump Wav.
    You can also dump VGM too if you want. (I prefer ripping to Wav though because its easier to turn into MP3.) Now, if your game has a Sound Test, go there and highlight whatever music track you want to rip or whatnot. Before you start up the music track, you need to click on the Dump Wav to activate it. A window will come up that allows you to place the file where you want it to go and also name. (Instead of going all the way back to the sound menu on the emulator you can alternatively press Ctrl+W to dump to Wav.)

    Now that you've selected the file name and path of your music track, The Emulator will be recording directly off your computer's sound card. This means that no background noise will interfere with recording. Quickly activate the music track in the game and play it. When you want to stop ripping music, just press Ctrl+W or go to the sound menu and click Dump Wav again. Then you are done.

    I hope you followed what I was saying.

    The procedure for ripping music with Gens is similar and therefore shouldn't need to be explained. (Except I can't remember if there was a Ctrl+W Hotkey shortcut though.)

    That's all there is. Its really easy to rip music with an emulator.

    I hope you weren't referring to attempting to rip music from actual hardware as that might be somewhat messy in terms of quality reduction.
     
  3. Ravenfreak

    Ravenfreak

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    Actually, I wanted to rip it off the real hardware...
     
  4. SegaLoco

    SegaLoco

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    Well, if you have Composite+Stereo out, there is a cable that is made to convert 1/8" audio to stereo, maybe it will work in reverse to dump music from the genesis. If you have RF, that just sucks. I bet there is a way, but I don't know it. Maybe hook it up to a vcr, and use the vcr's stereo out to record it.
     
  5. Mastered Realm

    Mastered Realm

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    If you have a Genesis 1 model, buy a headphone-like male to male cable and plugin one part of it in the headphone port on the genesis and the other part in the microphone port of your PC =P
     
  6. TmEE

    TmEE

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    "Line in" is the port to use, Microphone one is for microphones, and its mono too.

    Audio modded MD2, good sound card (no onboard crap !!!) and decent software will grant you the best results.
     
  7. MooMoo

    MooMoo

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    I think the Mega CD (If you have one) has left/right channel out-y holes if thats any help to you...
     
  8. Ravenfreak

    Ravenfreak

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    I own a Genesis model1, 2 and even a Sega CD. So which one would produce the best quality sound?
     
  9. Flygon

    Flygon

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    The model 1 is more likely to produce better sound, even more so if it has the rear extension port.
     
  10. Bibin

    Bibin

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    Actually, someone did a study, and found that the Nomad has the best audio quality (even more so if you remove the inverter).
     
  11. SegaLoco

    SegaLoco

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    It does???, I guess my speakers are fucked then. The Sega Sound is just *high pitched KZZZZT* *low pitched KZZZZT* I mean, not that dramatic, but still, its pretty bad.
     
  12. Chibisteven

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    Yeah, if you don't mind a louder noice channel, and clipping with Ice Cap (Sonic 3)
     
  13. TmEE

    TmEE

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    Nomad is definitely inferior to no-TMSS MD1, but if you remove 3 components from Nomad, you can get filtering point much higher (and thus increase crispness) and things are becoming quite nice, even slightly better than no-TMSS models.... I have yet to do a spectrogram comparsion.

    Nothing beats a CCAM MD2 though.
     
  14. ICEknight

    ICEknight

    Researcher Researcher
    [citation needed]
     
  15. Chibisteven

    Chibisteven

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    The Genesis you want is probally

    Model 1 - VA0 (recommended)
    Model 2 - VA4 (recommended)

    VA# is the revision of the mainboard.

    So an early model 1 or a later model 2

    A program like Audicity for recording
    Line In or Aux in port on sound card

    Record at 96,000 Hz at 24 bit

    Correct DC Offset

    Downsample to 44,100 Hz at 16 bit using special software

    Good luck.


    - Headphone to Headphone jack for model 1 - 1/8"
    - A Stereo A/V Cable and phono (a.k.a. RCA plug) to headphone 1/8" for model 2
     
  16. TmEE

    TmEE

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    for MD1, VA0 to VA4 are the best, VA0 and VA1 are early Japanese launch models.
    for MD2, VA4 has best sound unmodded.

    And in unmodded state, recording wuth sample rate higher than 32KHz will not give much benefit, particulary from MD2s, since they have everything filtered out from 8...10KHz and up. on MD1 the filter cutoff starts around 12KHz.

    Comparsion recordings :
    MD2 CCAM 1.0 -> http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/4/21/1876835/TF4.ogg
    MD2 stock -> http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/4/...35/TF4_MD2.ogg
    no TMSS MD1 (HiDef) -> http://www.fileden.com/files/2008/4/...35/TF4_MD1.ogg
     
  17. Bibin

    Bibin

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    This was the page I was referring to - I didn't look too far into it: http://www.protoman.com/genesisaudio/

    When I get my model 1 genesis back (trading a gamecube to get it back) how can I identify which MD1 it is?
     
  18. Chibisteven

    Chibisteven

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    Has to do with the fact you're recording the analog way, so it makes sense to record at such a high level. Filtered out all noice and anything that might be out of the range of human hearing can keep the aliasing of very high frenquencies or very high random noice out during downsample. Downsampling to level of a CD allows it to be burned to a CD easily.
     
  19. TmEE

    TmEE

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    The problem is that there is nothing much above (and well into) human hearing range other than noise/hiss... the filtering is really strong in the systems when they're unmodded, just look at some spectrograms, you won't bee seeing much besides noise above 16 or so KHz, no aliases or anything. That is a bit model dependant since Sega seemed to use components fairly liberally, same models have different components with different properties, which is amongst the reasons why some models produce better sound while others of the same kind do not.
    Nobody forbids you from using high sample rate, but its not really giving any benefits since majority of the stuff you get is noise/hiss up there.



    Regarding identifying the system, first you power it on, if you get TMSS screen its VA5/6 or VA7. If not its VA2, VA3 or VA4, you can get definitive answer by looking inside the system and looking for VA marking.
     
  20. Bibin

    Bibin

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    Shame, it seems I have a VA5, 6, or 7. I took modified it to add a standard composite out and S-video plug, but I'd be willing to take it apart and add more metal shit sticking out if it means higher sound quality.

    If I'm not recording, and just using it for casual game play, should I care about modifying it for improved audio?