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PS3 Blu-ray question

#1 User is offline Chaos Rush 

Posted 14 January 2012 - 05:08 PM

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Okay, so I just got a PS3 last week, and I have an HDMI cable.

My TV is 720p, but the actual resolution is 1024x768, which is slightly bigger than 720p.

My question is, what resolution should I display games in, and what resolution should I display Blu-Ray movies in? I know that most PS3 games are 720p at max, but all Blu Ray movies are 1080p. Even though my TV is 720p, it supports 1080i and 1080p signals (in otherwords, according to my PS3 its displaying in 1080p even though my TV is 720p, so I'm assuming its downscaling or something).

On a Blu-ray HD movie, what resolution should I set the PS3 to, on my 1024x768 TV, in order for it to look best? 720p? 1080i? or 1080p? I'm asking because my TV is slightly bigger than 720p, so I'm wondering if setting the PS3 to display at 1080i or 1080p would look better than 720p, since theoretically if I set it to 720p, it would have to up-scale it a little bit, but if I set it to 1080i or 1080p, it would downscale more than a little bit.

EDIT: this is my tv:
http://reviews.cnet....ag=mncol;subnav
This post has been edited by Chaos Rush: 15 January 2012 - 02:00 AM

#2 User is offline Krigo 

Posted 14 January 2012 - 05:25 PM

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1080p

or 720p

It's only worth bothering with 1080i if you have component. Honestly I used 1080p for a 720p monitor and never had any problems considering most games are 720p.

#3 User is offline Miles Prower 

Posted 14 January 2012 - 09:46 PM

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Go for 720p.

#4 User is offline FuzzballFox 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 12:51 AM

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Would probably be best with 720p

#5 User is offline Covarr 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 12:56 AM

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Something to remember: your Blu-Ray movies are gonna be in 1080p. If you run them on your PS3 at 720p, then FIRST they will be downscaled to that, and THEN upscaled by your TV back to 1024x768. In theory, you should have a cleaner picture by using the maximum your TV will accept, so that scaling is done in fewer steps.

#6 User is offline Chaos Rush 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 01:14 AM

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View PostCovarr, on 15 January 2012 - 12:56 AM, said:

Something to remember: your Blu-Ray movies are gonna be in 1080p. If you run them on your PS3 at 720p, then FIRST they will be downscaled to that, and THEN upscaled by your TV back to 1024x768. In theory, you should have a cleaner picture by using the maximum your TV will accept, so that scaling is done in fewer steps.

So then I should run my PS3 on 1080p when watching movies, because then the only thing it will do is downscale to 1024x768. If I run it on 720p, that means it will downscale, then upscale slightly, which would be slightly uglier than simply downscaling to 1024x768.

#7 User is offline sonicblur 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 01:30 AM

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View PostChaos Rush, on 14 January 2012 - 05:08 PM, said:

My TV is 720p, but the actual resolution is 1024x768, which is slightly bigger than 720p.

But 720p is 1280x720. If your TV is 1024x768, then it's a 4x3 TV and not widescreen, and also not bigger than 720p.
Did you mean 1366x768? If so, that's usually the maximum resolution you see when hooking up a PC to a 720p TV, and isn't actually an indication that your device has that many pixels.

The Blu-Ray specification does not require that the video content on discs always be 1080p. 1080p just happens to be the highest resolution video supported by the format. I own some movies on Blu-Ray where the extras are in 480p while the movie itself is 1080p.

I think the best answer to your question is something you need to investigate yourself. Try both and see if you notice a difference. In most cases I would think that you're probably better off with 720p, because I've noticed in some cases that small text is more difficult to read when downscaled especially when the content was designed to handle more than one resolution.

#8 User is offline Chaos Rush 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 01:55 AM

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View Postsonicblur, on 15 January 2012 - 01:30 AM, said:

View PostChaos Rush, on 14 January 2012 - 05:08 PM, said:

My TV is 720p, but the actual resolution is 1024x768, which is slightly bigger than 720p.

But 720p is 1280x720. If your TV is 1024x768, then it's a 4x3 TV and not widescreen, and also not bigger than 720p.
Did you mean 1366x768? If so, that's usually the maximum resolution you see when hooking up a PC to a 720p TV, and isn't actually an indication that your device has that many pixels.

It's definitely widescreen. I just looked up the model number and it said the resolution is 1024x768...weird, but its definitely widescreen, because if I set my PS3/Wii to 16:9 aspect ratio, it looks perfect, and if I set it to 4:3 ratio it looks very obviously stretched.

I've experimented with both and I can't really tell the difference...

EDIT: this is my tv
http://reviews.cnet....ag=mncol;subnav
This post has been edited by Chaos Rush: 15 January 2012 - 02:00 AM

#9 User is offline Nova 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 05:39 AM

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The difference is always going to be very minor and, in my opinion, not worth worrying about. That said, if you really want to get it right, just stick with 720p. The majority of games are 720p so you're going to be upscaling most of those anyway and the odd Blu-Ray that you do watch will look no worse for it.

Again, not really a huge deal. :v:

#10 User is offline Chilly Willy 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 06:21 PM

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View Postsonicblur, on 15 January 2012 - 01:30 AM, said:

But 720p is 1280x720. If your TV is 1024x768, then it's a 4x3 TV and not widescreen, and also not bigger than 720p.
Did you mean 1366x768? If so, that's usually the maximum resolution you see when hooking up a PC to a 720p TV, and isn't actually an indication that your device has that many pixels.


It's a plasma TV, not LCD. Plasma sets have long lagged behind LCD on resolution, and they're rarely using square pixels like LCDs.

#11 User is offline sonicblur 

Posted 15 January 2012 - 08:15 PM

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View PostChilly Willy, on 15 January 2012 - 06:21 PM, said:

View Postsonicblur, on 15 January 2012 - 01:30 AM, said:

But 720p is 1280x720. If your TV is 1024x768, then it's a 4x3 TV and not widescreen, and also not bigger than 720p.
Did you mean 1366x768? If so, that's usually the maximum resolution you see when hooking up a PC to a 720p TV, and isn't actually an indication that your device has that many pixels.

It's a plasma TV, not LCD. Plasma sets have long lagged behind LCD on resolution, and they're rarely using square pixels like LCDs.

That is really weird. I didn't know that, sorry.
(I've always avoided Plasma TV's due to the 10-year thing.)

#12 User is offline Chilly Willy 

Posted 17 January 2012 - 11:55 PM

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View Postsonicblur, on 15 January 2012 - 08:15 PM, said:

View PostChilly Willy, on 15 January 2012 - 06:21 PM, said:

View Postsonicblur, on 15 January 2012 - 01:30 AM, said:

But 720p is 1280x720. If your TV is 1024x768, then it's a 4x3 TV and not widescreen, and also not bigger than 720p.
Did you mean 1366x768? If so, that's usually the maximum resolution you see when hooking up a PC to a 720p TV, and isn't actually an indication that your device has that many pixels.

It's a plasma TV, not LCD. Plasma sets have long lagged behind LCD on resolution, and they're rarely using square pixels like LCDs.

That is really weird. I didn't know that, sorry.
(I've always avoided Plasma TV's due to the 10-year thing.)


No problem, most people don't know anything about plasma TVs. I've been following them since the first paper in IEEE. I like how plasma panels work, but it's harder to make the cells smaller and still keep them working without defect as they are a 3D structure as opposed to simple 2D layers for LCDs. That's why you don't see 5" plasmas. :)

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